WINNERS' CITATIONS


Journalists’ Charity Award – sponsored by Cision
The Journalists’ Charity Award is presented to an individual or body that has made an outstanding contribution to journalism and journalists in any way. This evening’s winner ticks all these boxes. Editor of The Guardian for more than 20 years and member of the controlling Scott Trust for closer to 30, Peter Preston was the key figure in the development and expansion of the paper and led a constant drive for editorial excellence. As a media columnist for The Observer, be became a vital voice in the rejection of those who wished to shackle the press and a fervent believer in the survival of print as an antidote to the worst aspects of social media. Most of all, Peter Preston was a thoroughly decent human being and a fierce defender of media freedom and the public’s right to know. The Journalists’ Charity Award goes to the late Peter Preston.

Georgina Henry Award for Digital Innovation – sponsored by Wiggin 
The highly commended entry submitted a riveting podcast which highlights the role of great investigative journalism led by women. Tip Off interviews female hacks all over Britain and explains how they got their stories into the mainstream. Well done to Maeve McClenaghan.

In an industry undergoing radical change the need to recruit journalists from as wide a range of backgrounds as possible has never been more urgent. Journo resources offers advice and more in an easy to follow, digestible way to help widen access and recruit more working class and diverse people into the industry. The winner of the Georgina Henry Award is Jem Collins.

Young Journalist of the Year – supported by the Cecil King Memorial Foundation
The judges said that the highly commended entrant submitted intelligent and insightful pieces on some of the biggest issues of the day. She is Eleanor Steafel of The Daily Telegraph.

The winner, however, was picked unanimously for his excellent reporting on Britain’s Haredi community. Young Journalist of the Year goes to Gabriel Pogrund of The Sunday Times.

Business and Finance Journalist – sponsored by EY
Highly commended for a “brilliant report on Oligarchs” is Tom Burgis of the Financial Times.

The winner led the UK news agenda by exposing the role of top London law firm Allen & Overy in silencing Harvey Weinstein’s former assistant. He also submitted a superb feature on the Murdoch family empire. Business Journalist of the Year for 2017 goes to Matt Garrahan of the Financial Times.

Political Journalist of the Year
The judges praised the highly commended entrant for producing fine political journalism that looked at the political grassroots rather than the elite. Well done to Kate McCann at The Daily Telegraph.

The winning entry produced a wide range of classic political stories. His disclosure of a secret 3,000-word letter from Boris Johnson and Michael Gove to Theresa May giving her detailed instructions on how to pursue a ‘hard Brexit’ was the biggest Downing Street leak of the year. Political Journalist of the Year for 2017 goes to Simon Walters from The Mail on Sunday.

Political Commentator of the Year
We have two highly commended entries this year. The judges said that both Stephen Bush from the i and New Statesman and Marina Hyde of The Guardian produced fine political writing in a year dominated by the goings on in Westminster.

The winner produced original reporting that included a fresh and much-needed take on what is driving political change in Britain. Political Commentator of the Year for 2017 is John Harris, The Guardian.

Foreign Reporter of the Year
The highly commended entry submitted strong and original reporting on a large and complicated issue. He is Kim Sengupta of The Independent.

The winner submitted a fantastic portfolio that covered the hunger crisis gripping Venezuela, Isis’ persecution of the Yazidis and the modern-day slave trade in Niger. Foreign Reporter of the Year for 2017 is Emma Graham-Harrison of The Guardian and The Observer.

Science Journalist of the Year – sponsored by Wellcome Trust
The judges said that the highly commended entry wrotewith huge authenticity and was particularly poignant when it came to his article about genetic testing and his own family. Highly commended is David Crow of the Financial Times.

The winning entry was the latest in a long series of scoops from this world class investigative reporter. He is uniquely talented at finding scoops and at turning complex science into brilliantly written stories. His death is a huge loss for science journalism and, if there were a lifetime achievement award in this category, the judges said that he would win it. For fantastic reporting on genetically modified babies, the Science Journalist of the Year Award goes to Steve Connor of the i.  

Health Journalist of the Year
The judges described the highly commended entry as being excellent. She submitted a great interview with Sir Bruce Keogh, and a compelling, thoughtful interview on eating disorders. Highly commended is Laura Donnelly of The Daily Telegraph.

The judges described the winner as a “no brainer”. His two-year drive to promote organ donation has influenced millions and, ultimately, the Prime Minister. Theresa May’s announcement earlier this year that she would change the law to bring in an opt out organ donation system was undoubtedly influenced by the Mirror’s campaign and, in particular, Andrew Gregory’s coverage of the plight of Max Johnson and the drive to enact Max’s Law. The winner of Health Journalist of the Year goes to Andrew Gregory of the Daily Mirror.   

Fashion Journalist of the Year
The judges said that the highly commended entry was well researched and suitably light hearted. Well done to Anna Murphy at The Times.

The winner was described as having produced “impressive, punchy and engaging journalism that made fashion highly accessible to a wider audience”. Fashion Journalist of the Year is Jess Cartner-Morley, The Guardian.          

Environment Journalist of the Year
The winner produced detailed and insightful journalism on the global shift to greener energy.  Environment Journalist of the Year, for the second year running, is Pilita Clark of the Financial Times.

Travel Journalist of the Year – sponsored by Normandy and Atout France
The highly commended entrants were praised respectively for “breaking the mould of travel writing” and for producing “informative and engaging copy”. They areJohn Arlidge of The Sunday Times and Chris Leadbeater of The Daily Telegraph.

The winner of Travel Journalist was described as being “laugh-out-loud funny and entertaining” and a fantastic writer.  Travel Journalist for 2017 is Martin Hemming of The Sunday Times.

Specialist Journalist of the Year – sponsored by JTI
The judges said that the winner dared to ask the questions that many others were afraid to ask. Her work into data analytics company Cambridge Analytica produced a complex, far-reaching technology investigation that continues to be followed up around the world. Specialist Journalist of the Year for 2017 goes to Carole Cadwalladr, The Observer.

ShowBiz Reporter of the Year
The judges picked two highly commended entries. The first they praised for “sensitive interviews with high profile names”. Well done to Chrissy Iley of The Sunday Times.

The second entry broke one of the biggest scoops of the year and his story was followed up by many others. Well done to Gary O’Shea of The Sun on Sunday.

The winner submitted three great scoops on the biggest showbiz stories of the year. From the Redknapp marriage, Ant McParlin’s drug abuse to the exclusive that Mylene Klass has been offered a confidentiality agreement to sleep with Harvey Weinstein, 2017 was his year. Showbiz reporter of the Year goes to Dan Wootton, at The Sun.

Sports Journalist of the Year
The judges said that the highly commended entrant is a writer who footballers trust with their most personal stories. Well done to Daniel Taylor of The Guardian. 

The winner is a proper investigative reporter whose work has had a real impact. The judges said that she submitted an outstanding entry that covered doping and corruption and the “duty of care” crisis in British sport. She set the agenda and delivered scoops. For terrific reporting on important stories, Sports Journalist of the Year for 2017 is Martha Kelner of The Guardian.

Interviewer of the Year Pop
Highly commended for “revealing and witty interviews” and “wonderful and intelligent interviews that were beautifully written” are Craig McLean of London Evening Standard and Cole Moreton, The Mail on Sunday.

The judges said that the winner had mastered the art of giving her subjects the confidence and freedom to be themselves.  For a fantastic interview with Katie Hopkins and a fascinating encounter with Alastair Campbell and his wife Fiona Miller, the award this year goes to Charlotte Edwardes of the London Evening Standard.

Interviewer of the Year Broadsheet
Highly commended for “perceptive and intelligent writing” is Emma Brockes of The Guardian.

The winner was described as a forensic interviewer who takes you on a deeper understanding of her subjects. Her work included an insightful interview with Alexandra Shulman and Rachel Dolezal. Interviewer of the Year for the broadsheets is Decca Aitkenhead, The Guardian.

Columnist of the Year Pop
Highly commended for accessible writing that “broke through the sporting barrier to the mainstream comment arena” is Oliver Holt, The Mail on Sunday.

The judges said that the winner writes a column that is defined by its intelligence, warmth and compassion. Her voice rings loud, elegant and true and 2017 saw her stand out from the crowd.  Columnist of the Year for 2017 goes to Alison Phillips of the Daily Mirror.

Columnist of the Year Broadsheet
Highly commended for being “a vital voice that produces bold and beautifully crafted arguments on a range of issues” is Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, i.

The winner was described as being “clear, concise and never predictable”.  He treats his readers like adults and he is the master of his subjects. For fantastic columns on Bitcoin and Donald Trump, Columnist of the Year for 2017 goes to Niall Ferguson of The Sunday Times.

Feature Writer of the Year Pop
The judges said that the highly commended entrant is “consistently gripping and masterful in his writing on the state of Britain today”. Well done to Ian Birrell, The Mail on Sunday.

The winner was praised for his ability to bring a unique insight to widely-covered stories and for being able to capture their essence. Feature Writer of the Year for the Pops is Brian Reade, Daily Mirror.

Feature Writer of the Year Broadsheet
The highly commended entrant was described by the judges as a “remarkable storyteller”. Highly commended is Christina Lamb of The Sunday Times.

The winner was praised for producing brilliant in-depth journalism that told a familiar story in a new way. His year-long work on tracking the death of every child or teen killed as a result of knife crime over the course of a year was remarkable. For important journalism that a had a real impact - Feature Writer of the Year for the broadsheets goes to Gary Younge of The Guardian.

Critic of the Year
The judges said that the highly commended entry was a joy to read. A contemporary and expert voice, highly commended is Rowan Moore, The Observer.

The judges said that the winner is not only funny and engaging, he offers both a cultural and political insight in his work. A stand-out winner for the judges, Critic of the Year goes to Hugo Rifkind of The Times.

Best of Humour Award
The judges said that the highly commended entry combined wit and squirm-inducing writing. Highly commended is Giles Coren at The Times for his column on lady bosses.

The winner’s piece included wonderful laugh-out-loud jokes that the judges felt set him apart in this category. His column was fantastic, relevant and hilariously funny. For a wonderful column on Jacob Rees-Mogg, the Best of Humour Award for 2017 goes to Hugo Rifkind.

Photographer of the Year
Highly commended for a great set of pictures isJeremy Selwyn of the London Evening Standard.

The judges said that the winner stood out. He may have been in the right place at the right time but his photographs spoke for themselves and they became the most memorable from the atrocity. Photographer of the Year goes Stefan Rousseau of the Press Association.

Sports Photographer of the Year

Highly commended for “capturing sporting moments brilliantly” isRichard Pelham of The Sun.

The judges said that the winner submitted a great all-round portfolio of well-executed images. Sports Photographer of the Year is Marc Aspland, The Times.

Cartoonist of the Year
The judges said that the highly commended entry was a collection of brilliant political satire.  Well done to Morten Morland of The Times and The Sunday Times.

 The winner submitted a superb portfolio including a fantastic cartoon of the Queen at Grenfell Tower. The Cartoonist of the Year goes to Peter Brookes of The Times.

Scoop of the Year – sponsored by Cision
The judges decided to highly commend two entries that were widely picked up elsewhere.  Highly commended are Ant in Drug Rehab by The Sun on Sunday and No 10 covered up Trident missile fiasco by The Sunday Times.

The winner, however, set the agenda for weeks and led to the resignation of the Deputy Prime Minister. Scoop of the Year for 2017 goes to The Sunday Times for its Damian Green revelations.

News Reporter of the Year
Highly commended for an outstanding portfolio that set off the Pestminster scandal is Harry Cole of The Sun.

The judges said that the winner produced fantastic reporting. He was the first western reporter to reach the outskirts of Raqqa, the global headquarters of the Islamic State and his writing in the region is now forming the basis of a film on the subject. He also produced two fantastic pieces of work of the detention of EU nationals and forensic reporting into the deaths of a number of young black men following contact with the police. For the combined package, News Reporter of the Year for 2017 goes to Mark Townsend, The Observer.

Supplement of the Year
Highly commended is Culture magazine by The Sunday Times.

The judges said that the winning supplement often sets the news agenda with global exclusives. It contains fantastic photojournalism as well as entertaining lifestyle content. Supplement of the year for 2017 is The Sunday Times Magazine.

Front page of the Year
The highly commended entry was praised for clearing its front page to allow this shocking picture to speak for itself. Highly commended is Assault on Westminster by The Times.

The winner nailed it by asking the question that was on everyone’s lips the morning after the Grenfell Tower tragedy. It was a powerful and shocking front page.  Front Page of the Year for 2017 goes to the Daily Mail and How the hell could it happen?

The Cudlipp Award – Campaign of the Year -  supported by the British Journalism Review
Highly commended for a long-running series of stories examining how global brands are making billions while refusing to take responsibility for what appears on their platforms is the Google and Facebook investigation by The Times.

The winner put together a hard-hitting campaign that embraced the public’s growing concern about the ecological harm of plastic bottles and containers. The Mail maintained pressure and this year the Prime Minister announced a 25-year-strategy to tackle plastic waste. A powerful and professional operation, the Cudlipp Award for the Campaign of the Year goes to Turn the Tide on Plastic campaign by the Daily Mail.

News Team of the Year – sponsored by United Utilities
The judges said that the highly commended entry was a powerful ongoing investigation that has revealed how huge advertising brands are unwittingly funding extremists and pornography online. Well done to The Times’ work on Facebook and Google.

The judges said that the winner was an innovative collaboration that included many reporters, covered five countries and took twelve months to make. What resulted was a fascinating multimedia story on the rise of populism across Europe. News Team of the Year goes to the team behind The Europopulists series at the Financial Times.

Sports Team of the Year
The judges said that the highly commended entry covered a broad range of sports and continues to be a daily must-read for football fans. Highly commended is the Daily Mail.

The judges said that the winner produced great all-round coverage during 2017. Particular praise was given to its football, cricket and rugby coverage and special mention was given to the work by Mike Atherton. Sports Team of the Year for 2017 is The Times.

News Website of the Year – sponsored by Google
The judges said that the highly commended entrant continues to be a daily go-to site with great news coverage and in-depth online exclusives. Highly commended is The Guardian.

The judges said that the winner was unrivalled for its flair, range and audience engagement during 2017. With great use of technology and hugely impactful exclusives, its commitment to groundbreaking journalism has paid off. Notable stories during 2017 included the Russian dossier and fantastic reporting on Grenfell that made it stand out from the crowd. The News Website of the year for 2017 goes to Buzzfeed UK.

Newspaper of the Year
The judges said that the highly commended entry is a strong package with some of the best writers in the business. 2017 saw a brilliant investigation into Google and Facebook and great all-round coverage. Highly commended Newspaper of the Year goes to TheTimes.

The winner had an outstanding year and it continues to be an authoritative and global must-read. The paper’s strikingly successful business model is underpinned by high quality journalism - a great feat of management and organisation as well as editorial excellence. From coverage of the Brexit negotiations to a stand out series on Europe, it continues to produce exceptional coverage both online and in print. 2017 saw it surpass 900,000 paid for subscribers and it has redefined itself as truly multimedia and relevant outside of those purely interested in finance. The Newspaper of the Year for 2017 is the Financial Times.